Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Turning Chain at the End of a Row - Chain and Turn or Turn and Chain - Crochet Tip #55

There can be a lot of confusion with written instructions that say "Chain and turn" or "Turn and Chain".  It all means the same thing.  I like to turn and then chain because that is what I have become accustomed to. The chain represents a stitch or the step up for the first row. 

How you turn your work is also preference and up to you. Sometimes I will notice a difference on the edge, if I turn my work counterclockwise.  Most of the time it does not make any difference and is not noticeable. If it is something that will be covered up with an edge, it will not matter.  


It is something left up for you to decide if you want to chain and turn or turn and chain.  The direction you turn your work is also preference.

5 comments:

  1. This is a good tip to keep in mind. I do sometimes get confused and keep wondering. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've done it both ways, but prefer to chain and turn. It feels like I can see that first stitch on the new row more easily. But you are definitely right that it doesn't make any visible difference.

    ReplyDelete
  3. thanks for this, i'm usually not one for reading patterns so tips are always good :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Teresa, I have a question about chains. When making a chain and you make the desired number, say 15, and the directions call to start a DC in the fourth chain from the hook, do you count the chain that is on the hook or the very first chain next to it?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Harold2,
    I have never counted the slip knot as the first chain on the hook. The chain next to it is always the first chain. When you end, you still have a chain on the other end of the hook that you are not able to do anything with. If you think about the anatomy of a crochet stitch, you always have a loop on the hook, in order to work more stitches. To chain, you have to have a loop on the hook, which is the slip knot. That will explain confusion for a foundation, if an author of a pattern is counting the slip knot on the hook as a chain, but did not relay that in the instructions. The worst thing that will happen is that you end up with an extra chain. That is not all bad.

    ReplyDelete

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